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COMEDY DEFENSIVE DRIVING®

  • "Really simple/straightforward course and you can do it on your own time."
    - L. Dao, Westminster, CA
    June 24, 2017 (Student # 3,500,614)
  • "Very user friendly and went along with my busy schedule."
    - L. Johnson, Dallas, TX
    June 24, 2017 (Student # 3,500,615)
  • "I liked that it is broken up into smaller segments."
    - J. Doan, Abilene, TX
    June 24, 2017 (Student # 3,500,616)
  • "It is easy to take because it is broken up into small segments."
    - J. Doan, Abilene, TX
    June 24, 2017 (Student # 3,500,617)
  • "The course is funny and joyful."
    - K. Lee, Bellaire, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,618)
  • "A little humor passes the time"
    - L. Ondracek, Lewisville, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,619)
  • "The varying characters and animations."
    - K. Roberts, Cedar Hill, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,620)
  • "The fact that i didnt have to listen to it"
    - W. Wallace, San Antonio, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,621)
  • "You can make a baby in the car but you cant leave it"
    - T. Price, Fulshear, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,622)
  • "How you liven up the course."
    - D. Lombardo, Dallas, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,623)
  • "It was easy and i did it on my phone"
    - N. Williams, Burleson, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,624)
  • "Not boring. it was pretty entertaining."
    - R. Zepeda, Richmond, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,625)
  • "You guys had a great sense of humor"
    - J. Blevins, Grand Prairie, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,626)
  • "That it wasn't boring. :)"
    - T. Torres, Fresno, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,627)
  • "Well explained and nit complicated"
    - M. Vera, Spring Branch, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,628)
  • "The different characters made it fun."
    - B. Lyons, Austin, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,629)
  • "The videos were very helpful"
    - A. Ray, San Antonio, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,630)
  • "Easy to start and stop when i had time to take the course"
    - J. Simmons, Clyde, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,631)
  • "Short videos with different characters each time."
    - C. Cubbage, Mckinney, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,632)
  • "It was funny and din't make me wanna shoot myself."
    - C. Ward, Tomball, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,633)
  • "The comic relief, otherwise really teadious."
    - L. Herndon, Plano, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,634)
  • "The videos being broken down into small manageable parts"
    - J. Harrell-broussard, Cypress, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,635)
  • "Humorous clips helped break the monotony of the education portion."
    - M. Dumas, Humble, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,636)
  • "That is was only videos and few questions"
    - C. Narvaez, El Paso, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,637)
  • "The experience of learning how to be safe whike driving"
    - T. Kemp, Houston, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,638)
  • "The experience to understand how to be safe"
    - T. Kemp, Houston, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,639)
  • "It kept five hours from being mundane."
    - S. Campbell, Bryan, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,640)
  • "It was serious yet humorous"
    - R. Chambers, Haslet, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,641)
  • "Specific to the state of texas."
    - F. Martino, El Paso, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,642)
  • "Online, small snippets of info at a time"
    - C. Quintero, Rosharon, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,643)
  • "Kept interested by not just spitting out data/facts."
    - M. Cook, Fort Worth, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,644)
  • "Easy to understand and entertaining"
    - C. Wilkinson, Dallas, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,645)
  • "The comedy part & the skits"
    - J. Butler, Houston, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,646)
  • "That i could read the information and skip over the videos"
    - T. Wilson, Allen, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,647)
  • "I liked that it was very engaging"
    - A. Nunez, El Paso, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,648)
  • "Was alot easier to stay interactive with"
    - L. Lochausen, Dallas, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,649)
  • "Was alot easier to stay interactive with"
    - L. Lochausen, Dallas, TX
    June 23, 2017 (Student # 3,500,650)

Railroad Crossings – Texas Defensive Driving Online Course

Railroad Crossings – Texas Defensive Driving Online Course

Chris Rail Road Crossings 
If you’re approaching a cross buck, you should be prepared because you may have to stop. Cross bucks are in place to signify railroad crossings. So don’t speed up there could be a train coming. A good distance to stop in front of the flashing lights or the gate is about 15 feet. If there is a flagman, or any other device directing you to stop sooner, you must do so. Remember a cross buck gives you advance notice of a railroad crossing is up ahead, so slow down, stop, look and listen.
 
It is illegal to go around gates which are down or to drive through flashing lights if you can’t see or hear the train coming regardless of whether or not you can hear or see the train coming. However, no stop needs to be made at any such crossing where a police officer or a traffic control signal directs traffic to proceed. Nearly half of all train collisions occur at crossings with functioning active warning devices. Remember trains cannot stop quickly. A 150 car freight train traveling 50 mph takes 8,000 ft or 1 and 1 half miles to stop. The highway department and railroad companies mark most of the public crossings with at least one of these:
 
• Red flashing lights,
• whistles or bells,
• closing gates,
• cross bucks,
• stop signs or
• other signs for warning you.
 
RR stands for railroad. There’s almost no excuse for a crash between a train and a motor vehicle.
After the year 2,000, it is estimated there will be over 270,000 railroad crossings in the United States and over 600 people a year will die in crashes involving a train and motor vehicle. Don’t be on the tracks when a train is approaching. It’s that simple.
Some people actually drive into the sides of trains. Some of the reasons people give for having a crash with a train are:
 
• Misjudging the train’s speed,
• Impatience,
• misperception of depth and
• driver complacency – which is simply not paying attention.
Actions to take if your car gets stuck on the tracks:
• Get out of your car and bring everyone with you.
• If you have time and a train is not coming push the car off the tracks.
• If you can’t get your car off the tracks, see if there is someone around who can help you.
• Call 911 for the local police department, so they can notify the railroad in case there is a train scheduled for that track.
 
If your car stops on the tracks when a train is coming get out of the vehicle immediately. Don’t stop to gather possessions. Run in the direction of the train but angling away from the tracks. Keep your head down.

All material in this video is the Copyright of Comedy Defensive Driving School® and is the Federally Registered Trademark of IDT, Inc. All rights reserved 1989-2015
**This course fulfills the requirements of the Traffic Ticket Dismissal for ALL courts in Texas and for Insurance reduction. This course can also be taken voluntarily to brush up on your driving skills.**
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